Monthly Archives: September 2007

Not getting the results you want from networking?..Consider this..

I’ve got to share an article I came across recently.

Business, like life, is about creating mutually beneficial relationships. I believe partnerships and joint-venturing are two of the best vehicles for expanding your network and influence. I seek out opportunities to joint-venture on projects, because as you do, you open yourself up to a whole new set of relationship and business possibilities.

Networking is all about making meaningful connections with people. But most people butcher the art of networking. Consider this article and let me know what you think…

___ From the blog of Tim Ferris ___

This week I interview Christine Comaford-Lynch. This five-time CEO not only sold or took public all of her companies, she has also assisted more than 700 of the Fortune 1000 with accelerating innovation. Bill Gates has called her “super high-bandwidth,” and she’s consulted with both the Clinton and Bush administrations. The best part? She never graduated from high school.

I convinced her to take time out from her new book, Rules for Renegades, to discuss one of the most important skills she’s used to climb to the top–networking.

1. How did you get yourself in the White House, and what were the most important networking lessons you learned there?…

I do a lot of favors for people, because I believe in “palm up” networking, which is networking to give and not to get. I figure the universe has a perfect accounting system. If I do favors for others, someone will do favors for me. It works.

I was asked to help out TechNet, a bipartisan group of tech execs, and one day (after working countless hours for free) I was invited to a party at the White House. There were only about 200 of us there, Stephen Hawking gave a fascinating lecture, and it seemed everyone I met was a Nobel Laureate. I felt a little insecure, being a high school dropout, but I shrugged it off and starting connecting with people.

After watching President Clinton for a while I approached him. Our interaction blew me away for 3 reasons: 1) he was incredibly charismatic, 2) he wouldn’t let go of my hand—the “I’m hanging in for the long haul” shake, and 3) when I asked him for more government support for American entrepreneurs, he expected me to follow up. He sent me a note about a month later asking where the proposal was that I had offered to write!

Throughout the evening at the White House, I shook a lot of hands. Some people gave me the “isn’t there someone more interesting here?” shake—you know this one: the person is looking over your shoulder, looking to find someone influential. Hillary Clinton gave me the “I’m sincerely pleased to meet you and I mean it” shake—solid eye contact with genuine interest. This is the shake I strive to master. It requires you to be totally present and paying attention to the person. Isn’t this what shaking hands should be about? Connecting?

2. Why was Clinton such an effective influencer?

When he is talking with you, it seems you are the only person in the world. His focus is intense, but softened with his southern charm.

Step 1, he makes you feel important, so you listen up. Step 2, he has the 2 key qualities I learned from Bill Gates and Larry Ellison: 1) supreme self-confidence (this is a choice, by the way—you often have to adopt it before you have evidence to back it up) and 2) an unshakable core (no matter what is thrown at Bill and Larry, they shake it off, hunker down, and emerge triumphant).

The rich and powerful think, act, and speak differently from the rest of us. If you try adopting supreme self-confidence, even for a day, you’ll be stunned by how the world responds. It treats you as if you deserve everything you ask for.

3. What are the most common mistakes that people make when trying to connect with high-profile influencers or celebrities?

They network “palm down” and have a lean and hungry look. Ugh. It oozes “gimme” and desperation. This is a massive turn off. Were they to network “palm up” and find out what someone cares about and offer to be of service, they’d connect with the rich and powerful.

I think they do this because they’re seeking short term gain, not long term connection, which will ultimately lead to gain. Don’t fall into the trap of stuffing your rolodex with contacts. Contacts are just names and numbers. Connections are meaningful relationships that enhance your life. Yes, they take more work. But life = the people you meet + what you create together. It’s all about relationships.

4. If you could give just 3 unorthodox but critical recommendations to the aspiring uber-networker, what would they be?

1. Fall in love with people. They are fascinating–everyone has amazing stories of trials, triumphs, moments when they had epiphanies. Every day you are taught by people. It can be the mailman, the woman making me a cappuccino, anyone or anything. The more we pay attention, the more we see how we’re all students and teachers of each other. This also boosts our interest in people, which boosts our authenticity when networking.

2. Do the “drive-by schmooze.” We’re all busy, and we need to optimize our networking time. Here’s how:

-Set a specific amount of time to network, such as 30 minutes
-Set a goal for the # of meaningful connections you want to make in that time, such as 5
-Here’s the fun part: enter the room and stop your thoughts. Don’t look for VIPs, simply feel the room and let yourself be drawn to people. Then introduce yourself and ask what business they are in, how they got into it, and what their ideal customer is. DON’T talk about yourself.

If you know people who might be potential customers for them, or great possible connections, mention it. Write a few notes on their business card. Promise to follow up. Then do it. Make your personal brand synonymous with results. People say life is 90% about showing up. That’s nonsense. Life is 90% about following through.

3. Tell someone you appreciate them daily.
This can be done via email, via the phone, or in person. Watch the person’s face light up as you genuinely express why you appreciate them. Then move on. You’re not doing this to get them to return the gesture. You’re doing it because it spreads great energy, it’s fun, and it strengthens your connection with the human race.

###

From Tim: The big fish need to like you before they’ll risk lending their name to help you. Focus on being likable, which means finding and connecting on common interests, then offering help or fun on a few occasions (not just once) before even suggesting that you could use help.

For it to work, the other side needs to see you as a relationship, not a transaction. In other words, the real players don’t need your help, so you can’t use that as the incentive. They need to enjoy spending time with you, whether on the phone or in person. I still hang out and grab drinks with the bloggers and technologists who helped me launch the book. That wasn’t the end game for me.

Remember–at the end of the day, it’s not whom you know that matters… it’s who knows you.

via the 4 Hour Work Week Blog

Video up and running…

Still working on getting a free application that will convert .mod video files to .mp4….thus the ‘trial version’ stamp on the video.  Anyone know of a good, free app that will do the trick?

[kyte.tv 11244]

New Blog Host

I am moving this blog from blogger.com to wordpress.com, as they have several features available to better serve my audience. Making the transition should be painless. Crossing my fingers and making the switch…

Upcoming Interviews

THE INTERVIEWS ARE FINALLY COMING!!!!

I’ve got several very exciting interviews coming up in the next few weeks with extraordinary folks. I will be positing the audio from these interviews on this blog, so be sure to keep this page bookmarked as new interviews are posted.

I will be interviewing extraordinary people who have achieved outstanding success in their lives. The word ‘success’ is a relative term, which most people associate only with material wealth. While I believe wealth is a component of success, there is also an intillectual and spiritual side to success, that I believe is equially important.

The purpose of my interviews is to persue my life-long study in the principles of success. What are the common characteristics of successful people? Can success be taught, or is it an innate ability held by a select few? What makes successful people different? Why have they chosen the route that they did? What difficulties did they have to overcome? What self-limiting beliefs do they deal with? What advice would they have for individuals who want to follow in their footsteps?

If you want to have success in life, you have to follow a model that is successful. As someone once said, if the recipe for making cookies is crap, the cookies will be crap no matter how good of a cook you are. It is finding the right ‘recipe’ for success in life that intrigues me, and should intrigue you as well. That is what we will find out here.

How do you define success? Is it a net worth criteria? Is there a spiritual or intillectual component? Let the world know how you define success!